Breakfast & Dinner

I’m sure many of you are wondering what happened to those two cute little pigs named Breakfast & Dinner.  Come on, you knew this day would come folks.

June 2018
November 2018

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There are a couple graphic butchery photos below, so just stop now if that bothers you or scroll really fast.

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Breakfast & Dinner lived a very happy, albeit short,  life at Spring Creek Acres.  They rooted up acres of pasture and enjoyed a non-GMO diet.  The sisters frolicked about and happily grunted when Farmer Shawn brought them treats every day and sprayed them down on hot days.  They grew bigger and bigger and bigger, until one day Farmer Shawn decided they were ready to become bacon, sausage, and other tasty delights.

Skinning (and no that’s not the same sled from the previous post…we have multiple pink sleds)
Sawed in half

I’m the first to admit, the killing and processing part is not fun and I was not overly involved.  Once everything was chilled and cut into less recognizable pieces, I joined the party.

Shawn sold two half pigs and invited the buyers to join in the processing.  Talk about knowing where your food comes from!

Let the butchery begin
Pat grinds meat for sausage as Heidi looks on

As you can see, we like sausage.  With some of our meat, we made Jalapeno breakfast sausage, Italian sausage, and German sausage.  I grew up eating smoked Geman sausage at my grandparents’ house on Sundays, so I was trying to recreate that.

10+ pounds of sausage meat ready for seasoning
Packaged sausage ready for the freezer
German sausage in casing ready for smoking
German sausage after smoking, ready for Christmas Eve dinner in Fresno

All in all, the processing of the two pigs took about a week and yielded over 300 pounds of meat.  Shawn also cured bacon and smoked the hocks.

Slicing Pat’s bacon
Mmmmm, bacon
Pasta with Italian sausage

We now have a freezer full of pork and chicken for the coming year, plus a bit of elk from the neighbor.  Raising and processing your own food takes a lot of time and effort, but it tastes so good.  Cheers to Breakfast & Dinner!

Layers

Yesterday afternoon it was sunny, so I suggested to Shawn that we walk to the mailbox.  This is a nice 1.7-mile roundtrip.  I put on a cotton/wool long sleeve base layer shirt with a fleece shirt over, thick athletic pant, knit gloves, and a beanie hat.  By the time we got down the driveway, which is a feat in itself, the sun went behind a cloud and I was cold.

Today, Shawn suggested a walk.  I looked out the window at the gray day and gave him the side eye, so he pulled out his phone to check the weather.  It was 36 degrees and the peak of the heat for the day.  I added some layers to the previous day’s outfit.  Long sleeve base layer shirt again, sweatshirt, fleece jacket, athletic pants, sweatpants, white cotton gloves under my knit gloves, and the beanie hat.  Instead of turning right at the end of our driveway to go to the mailbox, we turned left to go up the steep hill.  Now I had too many layers!  This matching the weather, the workout, and the layers is a delicate science that I need to perfect.

As seen on our walk:

We’ve had our first two snow events for the year.  The first dropped about 5 inches of snow after Thanksgiving.  It was enough snow to pull out the sled and find a mild downhill in our front yard.  Shawn also managed to pile together a snowman on the deck.  The first snow is so pretty because there’s no dirt mixed with it.

Black walnut tree

The weather station covered in snow. A good shake of the pole got the wind meter working again.

I found a few things to gather on the property.  We have a black walnut tree, and this is our harvest from November.  I was surprised by how many we got because I saw so few on the tree.  After shelling them, we ended up with about two cups of nut meat.  Since there were so few, we enjoyed them raw as a snack.  Next year we will hopefully have more so we can do some baking with them.  Very tasty!

Rosehips are purported to be high in vitamin C and we have a lot of wild rose bushes on the property.  I read they are best picked after the first snow.  Unfortunately, the deer ate all the conveniently located hips.

I’ve been enjoying my new sewing room.  A couple of years ago, I made my grandson a set of mini advent stockings, so I had to make some for my new granddaughter too.  Twenty-four little stockings stitched, trimmed, turned and in the mail in time for December 1st.

Ready for the countdown to Christmas!

Well, it’s 4:30 PM and dark outside, so time to put on another layer…

Fall in Northern Idaho

It was hot.  Then it was not.

We had mid to upper 90s in August, a week or so of 80s in September, then it dropped into the 60s mid-month.  On October 3rd, we had our first freeze.  That left us with a bunch of green tomatoes still on the vine, so we canned green tomato chutney.  I was a little skeptical, but it’s tasty.  Goes great with Indian food or over cream cheese with crackers.

Green tomatoes with red onion, raisins, dried apples, vinegar, and spices

We also harvested our onion crop.  We got quite a few, but they were small this year.  We will be better prepared next year and hope to get large onions like our neighbor’s.

The onions are small, but they have great flavor
Our neighbor’s onions were huge, 1-2 pounds each

Shawn grew some pumpkins, but like the onions, they came out small.  However, the few small pumpkins we got made a great puree and pumpkin bread.  He’s in the kitchen now whipping up a pumpkin pie!

Mini pumpkins make mini pumpkin bread loaves

We’ve also been doing more canning.  Our next-door neighbor got an elk and gave us some ground meat, so Shawn canned that with potatoes, onions and carrots.  While it tastes good, it was not pretty enough to warrant a picture.  I’ve been buying dried beans in bulk and canning them.  It’s very handy to have pinto, black, white, kidney and garbonzos readily available.

Soon it will be time to bottle our first experiments in fruit wine.  We will have a couple gallons each of plum, peach, and apple.

Improvements continue to be made outdoors.  We ordered seedling trees from the Pitkin Nursery at the University of Idaho in Moscow.  Shawn planted 20 Tamarac trees on the south end of the property and then potted maples, chestnuts and others for planting in the spring.  Most of our trees are evergreen, so it will be nice to have more fall colors in a few years.  We are also working on the planting area around the house.  We moved dirt to join to small hills.  Shawn plans to put a pond behind it.  I planted 120+ bulbs and divided and re-planted the existing peonies.  I hope I didn’t kill them!

Seedlings
New planting area behind the logs
Gratuitous pig photo

The kids and grandkids visited mid-October and the weather was picture perfect.  We went to Green Bluff for pumpkins and apples; we played at McEuen Park in downtown Coeur d’Alene, and we hiked the Cougar Gulch trail.  It was great having them visit!

Cougar Gulch Trail
We didn’t spot any cougars, but we found this old tractor

Cooler temps also mean more time spent in my new sewing room.  I made flannel jackets for the grandkids and started a new blue and white quilt.

While we are enjoying the changing of the seasons, we recently learned of another type of seasons in Northern Idaho.  Bug Seasons.  During the summer, we experienced yellowjacket season.  Now we are in stink-bug season.  There was also a brief two-week period of gnat season.  I’m sure you’re thanking me for not posting photos.

Fall in Northern Idaho

Six Months Later

It has been six months since we retired and moved to Idaho, and what a busy six months it has been!  I think we’ve accomplished a lot both inside and out.

Inside

  • Unpacked (mostly)
  • Removed tons of nasty carpet and wood flooring
  • Laid over 2,000 sq ft of new flooring
  • Installed new kitchen appliances
  • Replaced toilets
  • Painted about 70% of the walls, 16 of 27 doors, and 14 of 21 windows
  • Replaced numerous outlets and switches
  • Removed and replaced baseboards (in progress)
Living room before
Living room after (still needs to be painted)
Master bedroom before
Master bedroom after
Sewing room before
Sewing room after

Outside

  • Revitalized the old garden
  • Fenced and cultivated a new garden
  • Returned the old tractor to a working state
  • Felled numerous trees and trimmed others
  • Supplied power to the workshop
  • Built a chicken tractor and a chickshaw
  • Raised and processed 50+ meat chickens
  • Raised 9 laying hens and 2 roosters (we’re getting 8 eggs/day now)
  • Raised 2 pigs
  • Harvested cherries, plums, apples, cherry tomatoes, Armenian cucumbers, beets, carrots, onions, wheat
  • Canned cherries, plums, peaches, beans, chicken
  • Dehydrated cherries, plums, tomatoes, apples
Old garden before
Old garden after
New fenced garden
Meat chickens (Frankenchicks) before
Meat chickens after
Pigs in June
Pigs in September
Fresh eggs are a daily occurrence
Two of the many trees Shawn has dropped
Kootenai Electric installing the new transformer
Trenches and wire for power to the workshop

Our new lifestyle, location, and DIY projects also required the acquisition of a few new tools:

  • Snow shovel
  • Farm boots
  • Numerous pairs of work gloves
  • Loader, boom, chain harrow, and disk for tractor
  • Chainsaw
  • Chipper/shredder
  • Cultivator
  • T-post driver and puller
  • Oscillating multi-tool
  • Floor scraper (ultimate tool for removing staples in carpet pad)
  • Generator
  • Paint sprayer
  • Pressure canner
  • Dehydrator
  • Cherry pitter
  • Paper log maker
  • “No Hunting” signs
Posting our No Hunting signs along the edge of the property

The last six months have flown by, and we’re starting to get into a groove.  If the weather is good, we will work on an outside project.  Not so good, then we’ll do an inside project.  We’ve also taken the time to explore our new surroundings with a few hikes and camping trips.  We’ve taken up flyfishing (that’s a whole new list of equipment for another post), and visited many of our local breweries, restaurants and farmers’ markets.  Life is good.

Farmer Shawn Grows Wheat

We are surrounded by wheat fields, so we know wheat grows well in our area.   In early spring, Shawn planted a pound of wheat seeds in a row in our garden.  For the longest time, it was the only crop in the garden that seemed to be growing.

The green row in the center of the garden is the wheat

The wheat dwarfs all the other plants

By midsummer, the wheat was over two feet tall while the tomatoes and peppers were still taking their time to get their groove on.

This wheat thing is new to us, so once the wheat turned brown and the farmers around us began cutting their wheat and hay, Shawn knew it was time to harvest.  He cut all the wheat by hand and hung it in the garage to finish drying.

I don’t know if it’s a bushel, but this is our full crop for the year

Shawn did some internet research and learned how to build a DIY thresher.  It is pieces of chain attached to a rod in a bucket.  He uses his drill to turn the rod, and the chain beats all heck out of the wheat to separate the chaff from the wheat.

We cut the wheat heads off the stalks by hand.  I’m thinking the Amish are more automated than we were.  It took a few hours for both of us to remove all the seed heads.  The chickens were happy with any we missed.

Ready to thresh
Threshing
Threshed

The final step was pouring the threshed wheat in front of a fan to separate the seeds from the chaff.  The heavier wheat falls into the bucket and the chaff blows away.  Shawn did this process a few times.  The resulting product was over six pounds of wheat ready for milling into flour.

Shawn plans to plant an acre of wheat for next season, so we will need to work on our automation techniques!

Washington is Nice Too

When we lived in Sacramento, we would head to Apple Hill every year to get our fill of fresh apples and baked goods at the apple farms.  I found a similar area in Washington outside of Spokane.  In Green Bluff, in addition to apples, they grow peaches, cherries, berries, plums, and pears.  We visited a few of the farms today for some you-pick peaches and apples.  It turns out we are at the end of late season peaches and the beginning of early season apples, but we couldn’t pass up peaches for $1.10/pound and apples for $0.75/pound.

We learned the proper way to pick a peach.  Pull down and it should come right off if ripe.  Do not twist!  Put the peaches in the box stem end down.  The farmer’s 88-year-old sister-in-law was adamant about this process.  I hope to be so opinionated and vibrant at 88.  Now I need to figure out what to do with 18 pounds of peaches (aside from biting straight into them and letting the juice run down my chin).

We also toured the Strawberry Hill Nutrition Farm.  It is a “nutrition” farm because it is beyond organic, focusing on healthy chemical-free soil.  Verne gave us a tour of his 4-acre fruit and vegetable farm and he gave us tips of growing healthy produce.  He plants nasturtium flowers with his squash to keep the bugs away.  He said marigolds will make the squash bitter.  He also had red painted rocks sprinkled throughout his strawberry field.  He said the birds will peck on the rocks and be unhappy with what they find, so they will leave your strawberries alone.  And his last tip:  play classical music for your garden.  It creates a stress-free environment for you, the plants, the birds, and the bees.  And yes, there was classical music playing as we wandered through the garden and I was completely stress-free.

Cabbage
Arches of green beans

One of many greenhouses

On our way out of Green Bluff, we saw this house flying three flags.  The flag on the right says “Come and Take It.”  I had not seen the black, white and blue flag before, so I looked up the meaning.  It is the Thin Blue Line Flag.

The Blue represents the officer and the courage they find deep inside when faced with insurmountable odds. The Black background was designed as a constant reminder of our fallen brother and sister officers. The Line is what police officers protect, the barrier between anarchy and a civilized society, between order and chaos, between respect for decency and lawlessness. Together they symbolize the camaraderie law enforcement officers all share, a brotherhood like none other.

In Spokane, we visited Michlitch’s spice shop.  As the sign indicates, they have everything but the meat.  We sampled a few spice blends and left with two for making sausage (German and Jalapeno) and two lemon blends for chicken.

We ended our afternoon at the Iron Goat Brewery in Spokane.  We learned that the brewery is named after the garbage eating goat sculpture in Spokane’s Riverbend Park.  The metal goat sculpture has a vacuum inside that allows the goat to “eat” small pieces of garbage as part of a creative solution to eliminating litter. The statue will inhale just about any piece of refuse that will fit into its mouth.  It was built for the World’s Fair in 1974 by Sister Paula Turnbull.

The beer was good!

Not a bad way to spend your Wednesday.

Fun With Food

After a couple of weeks with days in the 90’s (and two over 100), we are starting to see fruit and vegetables ripening in our garden.  We’ve picked some cherry tomatoes, Roma tomatoes, Armenian cucumbers, onions, tomatillos, chilies, and plums.  We’ve finally identified the mystery fruit trees: two are plum and two are pear.  We’ll probably remove the pear trees because we aren’t big fans of pears and they are more dead than alive, but the plums get to stay.  I tried one today and it was delicious.

Armenian cucumbers are popular in Fresno where I grew up, and they are my favorite cucumbers because the skin is soft and not bitter.  My brother says I’m probably growing the first ever Armenian cucumbers in Idaho.  I made a quick Japanese pickle salad with the first cucumber.  The second one was added to tomatoes and onions.

Since our garden is not quite bountiful enough for canning yet, we took advantage of a sale at the local fruit stand.  We purchased a box of Washington peaches, a box of Fuji apples, and a flat of California strawberries.  From that we made:

  • 4 quarts of unsweetened applesauce
  • 4 pints of apple butter
  • 4 pints of strawberry jam

The peaches are still a bit firm, so we will peel and can those later this week.  The pigs and chickens are in heaven enjoying all the fruit and vegetable scraps.

Apples washed and quartered
After the apples are cooked, the food mill purees the fruit and discards the seeds and skins
Applesauce
A day’s canning
Fresh strawberry jam on a homemade sourdough English muffin

The laying chickens have finally kicked it into gear and are laying 4-6 medium to large eggs daily.   The yolks on the fresh eggs are a deep yellow-orange and very thick.  They make great fried eggs.  I’m getting experimental making frittatas.  Last night’s frittata included eggs, milk, jack cheese, bacon, breadcrumbs, tomatillos, onions, chilies, and garlic.  Shawn approved.  We aren’t sure what kind of chilies we picked, but they weren’t very spicy.

Last night, Shawn processed the last of the meat chickens (a.k.a. Frankenchicks).  He had to do the butchering at night because the bees and wasps are rampant during the day and very attracted to the meat and blood.  We now have a freezer full of chemical/drug-free chicken that should last us through the fall and winter.  Raising meat chickens was definitely a learning experience, but I think Shawn has it mastered now and next year should be a breeze.  (Check out his videos on YouTube.)

The nighttime butchering setup
That’s a tie-dyed apron, not blood
Bagged and ready for the freezer

Time to go see what the garden has to offer today…

Bird Watching

I’ve never really had an interest in birds.  Maybe it’s because we didn’t have a lot of birds in our suburban backyard in Elk Grove; just the annoying blue jays in our redwood trees.  Now we have an abundance of birds in our yard.

I cleaned the kitchen window and repositioned the bird bath so I can take pictures of the birds.  With the exception of the turkeys, as soon as I go outside they all fly off.  We have had as many as five magpies in the birdbath at once.   These are good sized birds.  At first, they appear to be black and white, but up close you can see they have blue and green in their tail feathers.

Our lovely electrical panel in the background

Still eating cherries…

We have a few hummingbirds in the yard, so I got them a feeder.  I always think of them as cute little birds, but they can be mean.  As I was watching the first hummingbird use the feeder after I hung it, another hummingbird swooped in and kicked the first bird off.  The feeder has multiple feeding ports, but the bully bird wanted the whole feeder to itself.

The finches are still living in Tito the dinosaur’s mouth.  There are other small birds that fly through the yard, but these two have decided to stay.

When we first moved in, we had three to four large turkeys that would wander through the yard on a daily basis.  They have been enjoying the feed that the chickens leave behind when Shawn moves the chicken tractor.  A few weeks ago, we noticed they have babies.  We now have a “rafter” of turkeys.  (See, I just taught you something.  My blog is so educational.)

This is most, but not all, of the rafter

Other flying creatures that enjoy the birdbath are wasps, bees, and yellow jackets.  Neighbors in the area have reported that the insects are having mass drownings in their pools in the current almost drought-like conditions.

Other Happenings Around the Homestead

I have a new stove!  The knobs were falling off the old stove and we were using pliers to turn on the burners.  Of course, the hole in the countertop was a quarter inch too small, so Shawn had to get out the saw and make it a bit bigger.  I’m still cleaning up the superfine dust.

Shawn whipped up a batch of Italian sausage from the pig he butchered in his butchering class a few months ago.

Eight pounds of Italian sausage sealed and ready for the freezer

Now that the weather has finally turned warm/hot, the garden is thriving.  The wheat is almost ready to be harvested and the tomatoes and tomatillos have set fruit.  One of the grapevines has grapes.  Our mystery fruit trees are full of hard green orbs.

Tomatillos
Don’t be fooled, they are not as large as they may appear in this photo
Two varieties of beets

The pigs are growing at a rapid rate.  Last week, Shawn introduced them to the electric fence.  They learn pretty quickly after a shock or two on the snout.  The electric fence allows them to have a bigger area to dig and root in which seems to make them happy.

I think this is what a happy pig looks like

Our chickens have started laying eggs.  We have four eggs so far.  They are small, but Shawn says they will get bigger as they lay more.

We are still painting and laying flooring in the house.  We’re working on the basement this week.  As usual, nothing is straightforward once you start tearing things up in an old house.  The wood stove in the basement was installed over the carpet, so now we need to dismantle it and lay the new flooring underneath it.  What were they thinking?

One of the 27 doorways in the house primed and ready for painting

Since we live on the Couer d’Alene Indian reservation, we decided to check out their annual Julyamsh powwow at the fairgrounds.  Tribes from all over the country come to compete in drum and dance contests.  The dancers were all ages: from grandma to toddlers.  It was very colorful, and the frybread tacos were tasty.

And then they invited everyone to join the dancing, so this couple did

We also took a walk along the beach and through the park in downtown CDA.  The best places in town to catch Pokemon.

We are off to the movies this afternoon to avoid what is predicted to be the hottest day of the year.  You can do that when you’re retired.

Alpaca Farm Tour

While searching for things to keep a five-year-old entertained, I came across the Seven Stars Alpaca Ranch in Coeur d’Alene.  According to TripAdvisor, the alpaca farm tour is the number one thing to do in CDA.  The 90-minute tour is $10/adult and $5/child and very informative.  The owner, Sonia, started with a brief lecture about alpacas (there are 22 different colors of alpacas), and then her husband Andy took us on a tour of the 40-acre ranch.

Sonia giving her talk in the lecture hall (converted garage)

Malcolm got to see a variety of farm animals.  We started with miniature donkeys.  They are about the same size as Malcolm and he was a bit skeptical about petting them.

Oliver & Olivia, miniature donkeys

While everyone was oohing and ahhing over the cute mini donkeys, Andy called to the horses and they came galloping over the hill.  They have standard and miniature horses.

Next, it was off to see the headliners: the alpacas.  We were cautioned not to hug them or get in a stare down because they will spit.

Watering the lawn
Heading out to pasture for a day of grazing

We also got to see chickens, goats, sheep and a couple of llamas.

One old sheep pretending to be an alpaca

Andy and Sonia lived in Alaska for 30 years before relocating to CDA.  Out in the pasture, they built a small replica Alaskan cache.  They don’t store food in it, but their grandchildren enjoy using it as a playhouse.

After all that livestock petting, we had a trip through the handwashing station and were then invited to visit the gift shop.

It was a fun and informative tour and exposed Malcolm to some other animals not found on Papa & Grandma’s farm.

Gratuitous cute grandson photo

More Cherries, Cherries, Cherries!

I like cherries.  In the past, I would buy a pound or so at a time when they are in season and enjoy eating them fresh.  But now I have so many cherries I don’t know what to do with them.  From our two trees, we have picked 12 lbs of sweet Bing cherries, 13.5 lbs of sweet Alberta cherries, and 21 lbs of sour cherries.  And there are probably still another 15 lbs of sour cherries on the tree.

Sour cherries and sweet Alberta cherries
Cherry pitters. We may need to invest in the counter mount, hand crank pitter for next year’s harvest.

I’ve canned cherries, made two kinds of jam, made a cherry cobbler, made muffins, made cocktails from cherry syrup, dehydrated tons of cherries, and made a cherry-balsamic reduction to drizzle on a fresh cherry pizza.  We have snacked on cherries by the handful and cut them up and eaten them over ice cream.  I’m running out of ways to use and consume cherries.

Malcolm was a big helper. He pitted cherries and helped make dough for the cobbler.
Sour cherry cobbler
Sour cherry cobbler a la mode
Enjoying cherry cobbler after a full day of cherry production

I made one batch of sweet cherry jam with the Albertas and one batch with the sour cherries.  I’m not a big fan of high sugar jam, but I found Pomona’s Pectin for low sugar jam and it worked well.  I used honey with the Albertas and it is a nice compliment.

The mini-cherry muffins were a hit with my little helper.  The tart cherries nicely balanced with the sweet muffin.

After all that cherry picking and pitting, a cocktail was in order.  Shawn and I experimented with ingredients, even going so far as adding some Kombucha for fizz.  Our favorite is one part cherry syrup to 3 parts Maker’s Mark over ice with a handful of fresh cherries.  The best part is eating the bourbon soaked cherries at the bottom of the glass.

This concoction was too sweet, so we switched to Maker’s Mark

While our son, Connor, was visiting we experimented with cherries on pizza.  We’ve had a heat wave, so we gilled the pizza crust outside on the barbecue.  We cooked fresh cherries in balsamic vinegar and then pureed and reduced the sauce.  We topped the pizzas with goat cheese, fresh cherries, bacon, and herb salad mix drizzled with the cherry-balsamic reduction.  Super tasty on a hot night!

The rest of the cherries were thrown into the dehydrator.  They will be good for cooking and baking throughout the year, or just to eat by the handful as Shawn prefers.